Emma Brassington

Emmajanebrassington at gmail dot com

07719222895

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Sweep through the galleries

10/31/2018

Loie Hollowell use of symetry and geometric symbols reminds me of work Georgina Houghton and Hilma af Klint. Similar use of symbolic abstraction, geometry and colour refer to the abstract nature of icons whilst she uses them to express female form. Through texture and relief- carving foam and using paint her work plays with the field acting between painting and sculpture. I am reminded of the wood reliefs I found and admired in Bali and once again i am reminded of the possibilities of experimenting with materials to create 3-dimensional work that operate in a 2-dimensional space. Her complex use of a simple crude colour pallets alongside the archetypal geometry allows me to consider the universality of simple form and shape. Pleasingly symmetrical and attractive universal references to the bodily landscape allows me to think about the common experiences of being.

 

Similarly, Conrad Shawcross's work induces a state of reflection whilst dealing with philosophical enquiry and geometric form. In the show: After the Explosion, Before the Collapse at the Victoria Miro gallery his continues to use materials often reserved for machinery such as steel, glass, and other metals. The show's main floor consists of his inquiry into the tetrahedon: a triangular, four sided pyramid which Plato claimed was the basis of nature some 2400 years ago. When in working order, his kinetic sculptures: Murmuration and Aberrations pronounce the elegance and precision behind technical design. Screaming precision in technical design, assemblage and movement his work calls respect for the scientific, logic and ordered: devoid of the more hap-hazard and emotive experiences of life. The shiny finishes and straight lines blending in perfectly with this it's surrounding white walls. 

 

In start contrast Kemang Wa Lehulere uses a blend of softer and familial materials like wood and chalk as well as bottles, leather straps and strings. Materials used together to create sculptural forms referencing the politcal  and social landscapes that he deals with as an activist in South Africa. 

 

 

 

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